Speakers

 

Nicholas Allen is Franklin Professor of English and Director of the Willson Center for Humanities and Arts at the University of Georgia.  He has published widely on Irish culture and is editor with Nick Groom and Jos Smith of the forthcoming Coastal Works with Oxford University Press.

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Guy Beiner teaches modern history at Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, in Israel. He has a PhD from University College Dublin and has been a research fellow at Trinity College Dublin, the University of Notre Dame, the Central European University and the University of Oxford. His forthcoming book on ‘Reticence, Oblivion and Remembrance: Vernacular History and Social Forgetting of a Rebellion in Ulster’ is due to come out with Oxford University Press.

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Andres Besoli holds a PhD in Didactics of Social Sciences and Heritage from the University of Barcelona (Spain). Graduated in History and Audiovisual Communication his research deals with the potentialities of digital technologies for generating captivating and audience-focused narratives to better display and disseminate the past in the context of museums, exhibitions, cultural tourism destinations and also formal education. Another facet of his research concerns the study of the twentieth-century European difficult history and heritage and their socio-political and cultural significance in the present, as well as their interpretation by means of public historical discourse.

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Mary Ann Bolger is a lecturer in design history at the Dublin Institute of Technology. She received her M.A. in History of Design from the Royal College of Art, London where she is completing a PhD on post-war Irish graphic design and typography. She is co-founder of the research group Typography Ireland, based at DIT. Publications include the monograph Design Factory: On the Edge of Europe (Dublin: Lilliput & Amsterdam: BIS, 2009) and a chapter on typographic commemoration in Making 1916: Material and Visual Culture of the Easter Rising, edited by Lisa Godson and Joanna Brück (Liverpool University Press, 2015).

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Dr John Borgonovo is an expert on the Irish Revolutionary period, with special emphasis on Cork.  His numerous books and journal articles include, ‘The Dynamics of War and Revolution: Cork City, 1916-1918’ published by Cork University Press in 2013.  He lectures in the School of History at University College Cork, and is coordinator of UCC’s Decade of Centenaries programme.

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Dominic Bryan is Director of the Institute of Irish Studies at Queens University, Belfast, and is presently the co-chair of the Flags, Identity, Culture and Tradition Commission in Northern Ireland. Dominic is an anthropologist researching political rituals, symbols, commemoration, public space and identity. He is author of Orange Parades: The Politics of Ritual Tradition and Control (2000). In 2014 he was co-author of The Flag Dispute: Anatomy of a Protest and recently was co-author of Flags: Towards a New Understanding.  Dominic was a member of the Living Memorial sub-group of Healing Through Remembering and is part of a number of research projects examining processes of commemoration.

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Verena Commins holds an MA in Ethnomusicology from the University of Limerick and a PhD in Irish Studies, from NUI Galway. She has taught at NUI Galway’s Centre for Irish Studies since 2009 and her teaching and research centre on concepts of re-traditionalisation, festival, commemoration and authenticity in the appraisal of Irish traditional music contexts in Ireland and the diaspora. She is Academic Director of customised Irish Studies programmes and co-founder of Comhrá Ceoil, an Irish music and dance studies research cluster, at NUI Galway.

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Elizabeth Crooke is Professor of Heritage and Museum Studies at Ulster University where she leads the Engaging the Past research cluster in the Arts and Humanities Research Institute, Ulster University. Elizabeth has published Museums and Community: Ideas, Issues and Challenges (Routledge 2008) and Politics Archaeology and the creation of a national museum of Ireland (Irish Academic Press 2000). She is co-investigator on the AHRC & HLF project Living Legacies 1914-18: From past conflict to shared future.  Elizabeth is Chairperson of Board of Directors Northern Ireland Museums Council and on the Board of Directors of the Irish Museums Association. She recently published ‘Artefacts as Agents for Change: Commemoration and Exchange via Material Culture in Irish Political Studies (2016 31, 1).

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Brian Crowley is the Curator of the Pearse Museum and the author of ‘Patrick Pearse, A Life in Pictures’. He has also had articles published in ‘Making 1916’ and ‘The Life and After-Life of P. H. Pearse’. He is the current chair of the Irish Museums Association.

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Lorraine Dennis is currently Project Manager for the Visual Voices of the Prisons Memory Archive: preservation, access and engagement project at Queens University Belfast. Supported by the Heritage Lottery Fund, the project aims to develop the 170 recordings from Armagh Maze and Long Kesh prisons as a sustainable resource which captures some of Northern Ireland’s troubled past. From its inception the Prisons Memory Archive had public engagement at its core with participants co-owning their recordings. This is just one aspect of an ethical framework within which the PMA has developed its culture of engagement to effect change on society. Lorraine’s involvement with the PMA spans almost a decade beginning with her role as researcher in 2006, when the first recordings were made. In that time she has worked in universities, local government and voluntary sectors experiencing all that is good, and bad in participatory practice.

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Brian Hand is an artist and writer and is a lecturer at  The Wexford Campus School of Art and Design, IT Carlow.   Hand is a graduate of NCAD and the Slade School of Art, London. Hand’s first solo show, A Secret Society Derailed by Stages was a multi media art intervention and the first of its kind  in Kilmainham Gaol (1990) where he was an artist in residence. Since then Hand has exhibited in The Douglas Hyde Gallery; The Project Arts Centre; Limerick City Gallery; EVA, Limerick; Switch Gallery Belfast; The Dock Carrick on Shannon, The CCA , Glasgow; PICA, Perth; Grey Art Gallery, New York; Clock Tower Gallery, New York; ICA, Philadelphia; Rotor, Centre for Contemporary Art Graz, Austria; Kiev, Ukraine; Sonsbeck, Arnheim; Greenwich, London and the Void, Derry. He was a member of Blue Funk in the early 1990s and worked on all of their projects including the film c/o funded by the Irish Film Board. In the mid 90s Hand was awarded the PS1 International studio award and spent 2 years working and exhibiting in New York, his research contributed to the documentary on the Hospital Sweepstakes If You’re Not in, You Can’t Win directed by Liam Wylie in 2003. Recently Hand has collaborated with Alanna O’Kelly and Orla Ryan  for the art project Stormy Petrel/ Guairdeall.  This project was commissioned  by the GPO An Post Witness history Museum and exhibited in the Vietnamese Women’s Museum Hanoi (May 2016). At the end of the 1990s Hand received a critical writing bursary from the Arts Council and published a series of essays on art and audiences. Hand also contributed to the Arts Councils research on art and science collaborations. As an artist  Hand has written  catalogue essays for  Anne Tallentire, Noel Sheridan, Daphne Wright, Dennis McNulty, Colin Darke amongst others. Hand’s most recent writing has appeared in essays commissioned for Creative Ireland, The Abbey Theatre, IMMA’s What is… series and Making 1916: The Material and Visual Culture of the Easter Rising  edited by Lisa Godson and Joanne Brucker (2015).

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Catherine Harper is shortly to be appointed Deputy Vice-Chancellor of University of Chichester, UK. Professor of Textiles, she holds a PhD in Textile Engineering, is Editor of TEXTILE: Cloth & Culture and Textiles: Critical and Primary Sources (Bloomsbury 2012). Currently developing Oestrogen Rising: Stained and Bloodied Cloths monograph, Catherine published Intersex (Berg) in 2007, and is most recently in print in Taylor & Francis’ Social Identities: Race, Nation and Culture. She is currently in receipt of Textile Society Critical Writing Award, and Marc Fitch Trust and Society of Antiquaries, London funding. Originally a visual artist, Catherine’s work sits in private and public collections, including those of the Irish Government and the UK’s National Health Service.

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Marguerite Helmers is Professor of English at the University of Wisconsin Oshkosh and former fellow at the Humanities Institute, University College Dublin. She is the author and editor of numerous books and articles on cultural history and visual communication, including, most recently, Harry Clarke’s War: Illustrations for Ireland’s Memorial Records, 1914-1918 (Irish Academic Press 2016). She is a frequent speaker on Harry Clarke, early 20th century Irish cultural history, and the First World War.

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Annie Fletcher is currently Chief Curator at the Van Abbemuseum, Eindhoven. She also tutors at De Appel, Amsterdam, the Dutch Art Institute Arnhem and the Design Academy Eindhoven. She recently worked on the exhibition “El Lizzitsky: the Artist and the State at IMMA Dublin, and  a “Republic of Art” at the Van Abbemuseum in 2015.  She was lead contributor from the Van Abbe to the “Museum as Hub” collaboration led by the New Museum in New York from 2006 – 2014  and is part an on-going collaborative team which developed  the “Museum of Arte Util” with Tanja Bruguera in 2013 and continues to develop the Association of Arte Util today. She curated “After the Future” at Eva Ireland’s International Biennial of Visual Art in 2012. Other projects include solo exhibitions or presentations with Ahmet Ogut, Hito Steyerl, Sheela Gowda, David Maljkovic, Jo Baer, Jutta Koether, Deimantas Narkevicius, Minerva Cuevas, and the long term projects, Be(com)ing Dutch (2006-09) and Cork Caucus (2005) with Charles Esche. She was co-founder and co-director of the rolling curatorial platform “If I Can’t Dance, I Don’t Want To Be Part Of Your Revolution” with Frederique Bergholtz and Tania Elsgest. With Sarah Pierce she developed the Para Education Department at Witte de With in 2004. As a writer she has contributed to various magazines and publications

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Lar Joye is curator of military history at the National Museum of Ireland. He is the curator of the award-winning Soldiers & Chiefs exhibition and has worked on the recent exhibitions the History of Ireland in 100 Objects, 1913 Lockout, Recovered Voices – the Irish soldier in WWI and with ANU productions on the theatre show Pals – the Irish at Gallipoli.    He is a graduate of Leicester University and the Getty Leadership Institute.  Lar is chairman of the Irish National Committee of the Blue Shield and a member of the Board of Directors of the Irish Museums Association and the Military Heritage of Ireland Trust.

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Gerry Kearns is Professor of Geography at Maynooth University. He works at the intersection of political, medical and historical geography. His works include Geopolitics and Empire: The Legacy of Halford Mackinder (Oxford University Press 2009) and the collection edited with David Meredith and John Morrissey Spatial Justice and the Irish Crisis (Royal Irish Academy 2014). He has recently published articles on Primo Levi and Holocaust Memory (in Versus: Quaderni di Studi Semiotici 119, 2014), on the Biopolitics of the Security State (in Environment and Planning D: Society and Space 32:5, 2014), and on Irish anticolonial nationalism (in Historical Geography 42, 2014). He has two projects funded by the Irish Research Council, a study of the relations between Geography and the Arts (http://geographicalturn.wordpress.com) and another on the place of the Proclamation in the Commemoration of 1916 (http://1916proclamation.net).

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Bernard Kelly is an honorary postdoc in the Scottish Centre for Diaspora Studies at the University of Edinburgh. He specialises in the cultural and social effects of conflict and military service, and is the author of two books on Ireland during the Second World War.

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Róisín Kennedy is a lecturer  in the School of Art History and Cultural Policy in University College Dublin. She is former curator of the State Collection at Dublin Castle (1998-99), and Yeats Curator at the National Gallery of Ireland (2006-08). Her research focuses on censorship and art and on the critical reception of modernist art in Ireland. She has contributed to Circa, Third Text, the Journal of Art Historiography and numerous edited collections of essays, including chapters in Creating History. Stories of Ireland in Art, Irish Academic Press, and Modernist Afterlives, Anthem Press, both forthcoming October 2016.

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Claudia Kinmonth is a Moore Institute Visiting Research Fellow at N.U.I. Galway where she is revising her first award winning book Irish Country Furniture 1700-1950. Her second book (also with Yale University Press) was Irish Rural Interiors in Art. She worked at the Victoria and Albert Museum & Sir John Soane’s Museum. Her research instigated several exhibitions of Irish genre paintings, for example at Cork’s Crawford Gallery (2006) and Boston College (2012). The latter juxtaposed vernacular furniture with paintings of interiors. Her recent interdisciplinary research into dual-purpose traditional wooden vessels ‘Noggins: the nicest work of all’, is in The Irish Georgian Society’s current journal.

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Dr. Tina Kinsella is Lecturer in Critical and Contextual Studies (Fine Art), Faculty of Film, Fine Art and Creative Technologies, Institute of Art, Design and Technology Dun Laoghaire and Research Fellow at the Centre for Gender and Women’s Studies, Trinity College Dublin. Her research institutes conversations between artistic practice and process, psychoanalysis, affect theory and gender studies to explore performative intersections between aesthetics, ethics and subjectivity. Recent and forthcoming publications include: ‘Interview with Bracha L. Ettinger’, Studies in Gender and Sexuality (2017); ‘The Performative Performances of Micol Hebron’, Inappropriate Bodies: Art, Design and Maternity, Demeter Press (2017); ‘Liquidities – Transactive Border Spaces and Threshold Structures (Between the Harbour and the Sea)’, Performance Research Journal, Volume 21, Issue 2 – ‘On/At Sea’, co-authored with Dr. Silvia Loeffler (2016); ‘This is the fluid in which we meet … On Alice Maher’s Recent Drawings, The Glorious Maids of the Charnel House’, Kevin Kavanagh Gallery (2016); ‘Representing Desire? Reconsidering Female Sexuality and Eroticism in Umbilical’, Performance Ireland Journal (2016); ‘Sundering the Spell of Visibility: Bracha L. Ettinger, Abstract-Becoming-Figural, Thought-Becoming Form’, in And My Heart Wound-Space Within Me’, 14th Istanbul Biennial (2015); ‘Sticky Mothers – From Crypt to Transcrypt: A Response to Dragan Kujundžics’s Frozen Time, Liquid Memories,’ Interkulturalnost/Interculturality (2015); ‘Painting the Feminine into Ontology: On the Recent Works of Bracha L. Ettinger’, Museo Leopoldo-Flores/Galeria Poliavalente, Mexico (2014).

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Declan Long is a lecturer in the Faculty of Visual Culture at the National College of Art & Design, Dublin, and is programme director (with Francis Halsall) of the MA Art in the Contemporary World.  His academic research over recent years has been primarily concerned with the contemporary art of post-conflict Northern Ireland. He is a contributor to Artforum International, Frieze Magazine and Source Photographic Review and is a board member of the Douglas Hyde Gallery, Dublin. During 2013 he served as a member of the Turner Prize judging panel.

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Brenda Malone, historian and museum professional, has worked for the National Museum of Ireland since 2000, and has studied in detail the museum’s Historical, Military and Easter Week Collections, co-curating Soldiers and Chiefs – The Irish at War at Home and Abroad from 1550 to the Present Day (2006), 1913 Lockout – Impact and Aftermath (2013), Recovered Voices: Stories of the Irish at War 1914-1915 (2014), and the 1916 Centenary Exhibition at Collins Barracks – Proclaiming a Republic: The 1916 Rising. She is also known as the author of The Cricket Bat that Died for Ireland, a blog that tells the often complex stories behind the historical objects collected by the museum.

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Dr. Emily Mark-FitzGerald is Lecturer/Assistant Professor in the School of Art History and Cultural Policy at University College Dublin. An art and cultural historian specializing in the visual and material culture of Irish famine, poverty, migration and diaspora, she is one of the Directors of the Irish Museums Association (2009 – present). Her monograph Commemorating the Irish Famine: Memory and the Monument (Liverpool University Press, 2013, paperback 2015) has been hailed as a ‘landmark study’ in the field of Irish memory and visual culture. She represents Art History on the Historical Studies Committee of the Royal Irish Academy, and is a core advisory board member of the International Network for Irish Famine Studies. She is currently Co-Director of the UCD+NCAD Centre for Creative Arts and Critical Cultures.

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Laura McAtackney is an Associate Professor in Sustainable Heritage Management at Aarhus University, Denmark. An archaeologist by training, her current research uses contemporary archaeological approaches, and its heritage implications, to explore areas as diverse as material barriers in post-conflict Northern Ireland, female experiences of political imprisonment during the Irish Civil War and race/social relations on early modern Montserrat in the Caribbean (the latter is as a member of the SLAM project at Wayne State University and Brown University in the US). She published An Archaeology of the Troubles: the dark heritage of Long Kesh/Maze (Oxford University Press) in 2014 and created and maintains a website on female experiences of imprisonment during the Irish Civil War http://kilmainhamgaolgraffiti.com. She is secretary of CHAT (Contemporary and Historical Archaeology in Theory group) and is co-assistant editor of Post Medieval Archeology.”

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Caroline McCaffrey-Howarth is an AHRC-funded Art History PhD candidate and White Rose Scholar at the University of Leeds, and in Spring 2017 will be a visiting Research Fellow at the Winterthur Museum in America. Whilst her research interests span the history of design, decorative arts and the art market from the 18th Century to modern day, her doctoral thesis examines the ‘mania’ behind the history of collecting eighteenth-century French decorative art in Britain from 1802-1882. Caroline has just completed her first publication on the visual representation of design in the 19th Century for ‘The Cultural History of Furniture’, Bloomsbury Press forthcoming, 2017.

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Caoimhín Mac Giolla Léith is Associate Professor in the School of Irish, Celtic Studies & Folklore at University College Dublin. In addition to his writings on literature in Irish, both medieval and modern, his many publications on contemporary art include recent essays on the work of Douglas Gordon, Lutz Bacher, Marlene Dumas and Nairy Baghramian. He is a contributor to Afterall, Artforum, Frieze, Mousse and Parkett, has curated exhibitions in Dublin, London, Amsterdam and New York and was a juror for the 2005 Turner Prize.

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Kathryn Milligan is the inaugural ESB Fellow at the ESB Centre for the Study of Irish Art, at the National Gallery of Ireland. She received her doctorate from Trinity College Dublin in 2015, where her thesis examined the depiction of Dublin in visual art in the period 1850 – 1950. This is currently being prepared for publication. Presently, Kathryn is the editor of Artefact, the journal of the Irish Association of Art Historians and also the current chair of the Association. Recent publications include ‘Edmond Delrenne: Witness to 1916’ (Irish Arts Review, Winter 2015) and ‘The artistic cost of 1916: the Property Losses (Ireland) Committee and the Royal Hibernian Academy’ (Digital Repository of Ireland/Inspiring Ireland, May 2016).

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Vukasin Nedeljkovic is a PHD student at Centre for Transcultural Research and Media Practice at Dublin Institute of Technology. He initiated multidisciplinary project Asylum Archive. Asylum Archive is not a singular art project that stands ‘outside of society’ engaged in an internal conversation. Rather it is a platform open for dialogue and discussion inclusive to individuals who have experienced a sense of sociological/geographical ‘displacement’, social trauma and violence. It is an act of solidarity to bring a different perspective on the life of people who came to Ireland to seek protection.  Asylum Archive’s objective is to collaborate with asylum seekers, artists, academics, civil society activists and immigration lawyers, amongst others, with a view to creating an interactive documentary cross-platform online resource, critically foregrounding accounts of exile, displacement, trauma and memory. www.asylumarchive.com

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Niamh NicGhabhann is the course director of the MA Festive Arts programme at the Irish World Academy of Music and Dance at the University of Limerick. Her research explores Irish architectural history, with an emphasis on ecclesiastical buildings in the nineteenth and early twentieth century in Ireland. She is currently at the beginning of a research project exploring the construction of the Catholic urban landscape from 1830 to 1930. She is also involved in research projects exploring issues of cultural policy, interdisciplinary research practices, and cultural entrepreneurship. Her monograph, _Medieval Ecclesiastical Buildings in Ireland 1789-1915: Building on the Past_, was published by Four Courts Press in 2015.

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Helen O’Carroll is a native of Tralee, Co. Kerry. A graduate of University College Dublin, she holds an MA in History (1990) and a Diploma in Arts Administration (1991). She has been involved in heritage projects in Kerry for nearly twenty-five years and has been Curator of Kerry County Museum since 2000. In 2016 she produced ‘Casement in Kerry: A Revolutionary Journey’, a major exhibition marking the centenary of the Easter Rising in 1916. The exhibition was officially opened by President Michael D Higgins on 21 April 2016

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Aislinn O’Donnell is Professor of Education in Maynooth University. Publishing widely nationally and internationally, and engaging in international networks like the Anna Lindh Foundation, ERASMUS+, New Research in Philosophy of Education, and COST, Aislinn has developed a number of creative research and teaching projects that seek to introduce philosophy to settings like the prison, probation projects, and drug projects, as well as schools. She has an ongoing collaborative project in primary schools called Art and Philosophy in the Classroom with gallery educator and curator, Katy Fitzpatrick. Aislinn is interested in exploring innovative and experimental approaches to teaching philosophy, fostering cross-disciplinary dialogue between philosophy and other subject areas, and developing pedagogical strategies to help us to reflect upon ethics, inclusion, diversity, and the global refugee crisis in educational institutions and society. She is also interested in thinking about how public institutions in Ireland can become more pluralistic and participatory, creating more opportunities for the voices of all those who are part of those institutions to be heard. Further information can be found. http://maynoothuniversity.academia.edu/AislinnODonnell

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Dr Louise Purbrick is Principal Lecturer in the History of Art and Design in the School of Humanities, University of Brighton (http://arts.brighton.ac.uk/staff/louise-purbrick). Her research is devoted to the understanding of materiality and she has written about the meaning of things that circulate within sites of conflict, landscapes of exploitation as well as everyday domestic worlds. Louise has published a number of articles on the material history of Long Kesh/Maze prison and the conflict ‘in and about’ Northern Ireland. She is currently completing an Arts and Humanities Research Council project, Traces of Nitrate (http://tracesofnitrate.org), which examines the political legacies of nitrate mining the Atacama Desert of northern Chile.

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Kayla Rose is Postdoctoral Research Fellow at Bath Spa University. She joined the university in January 2015 as Research Fellow in Design History on the AHRC/Design Council project, ‘Bristol and Bath by Design’, working across the fields of history, design history and urban studies. Kayla holds a PhD from Ulster University, having completed her thesis on the history and material culture of identity in nineteenth- and early twentieth-century Ireland as expressed through illuminated addresses. She graduated with her MPhil in Irish Art History from Trinity College Dublin and her BA in Art History and Criticism from Stony Brook University (SUNY).

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Orla Ryan is an artist,  curator, lecturer  and writer. Ryan is a graduate of DCU, NCAD, St. Martin’s School of Art and as a Fellow  (studio Practice ) of the Whitney Museum ISP, New York was awarded a Fulbright scholarship. Recently she has collaborated with Alanna O’kelly and Brian Hand  on an art project Stormy Petrel /Guairdeall.  This collaboration was one  of the GPO / An Post Witness History Museum Public Art Commissions in April 2016. This collaboration also exhibited at The Vietnamese Women’s Museum, Hanoi  supported by The Irish Embassy in Hanoi and Culture Ireland.  Stormy Petrel/Guairdeall  also published an artist book/CD  Thug siad oíche ar guairdeall dom -they  left me wandering all night (Folded Leaf 2016).   Ryan collaborated with Maolíosa Boyle to bring  Dinh Q. Le’s recent Ikon/ Art Angel Commission the Colony  to Void Derry (June/July 2016). Other  recent curatorial  research projects  include Spring Watching Pavilion (2015). Ryan’s work has been published in Inter-Asia Cultural Studies (2013). Art pages are also  included in Charley 01 (Les Presse du Reel, 2001)and Je Veux, One Star Press in association with Palais deTokyo (2002) and in Between a Dog and a Wolf  as part of the CCA’s Our Neighbourhood , a participatory public project led by Sara Greavu and Sarah Browne. (2015)Ryan lecturers at The Wexford Campus School of Art and Design, IT Carlow. She has been awarded numerous awards for her academic and creative research including those from The Government of Ireland Research Council,  the Arts Council, The British Council.

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Kenneth Shonk is an Assistant Professor of World History and Social Studies Education at the University of Wisconsin-La Crosse. He earned his PhD from Marquette University in Milwaukee, USA in 2010 under the guidance of Timothy McMahon. He is the former president of the Midwest Region of the American Conference of Irish Studies. Recent work has appeared in New Hibernia Review. Forthcoming publications include a contribution to a collection entitled Ireland in an Imperial World (Palgrave, 2017) and is co-author of History Theory and Methods Through Popular Music, 1970-2000 (Palgrave 2017).

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